Getting balance right
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Offline Rampage

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Getting balance right
« on: September 03, 2012, 08:03:46 PM »
G-day all need some help on setting up boat for bow mount,battery,livewell,etc. what I need to now is how to get the weight distribution and balance right. The boat is a 429 stacer with a 30hp mariner.

Thanks
David



Offline redrocket

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2012, 08:55:17 PM »
My tub is 435 and I have my battery and 120lt live well up the front and its fine, I do have a 40 4 stroke on the back to compensate a bit though.
The best way would be to put the battery and well in temp and take it for a run.

Offline Rampage

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2012, 09:15:30 PM »
Might be the way to go red, I'm guessing when you put 2 people,livewell,battery's,bow mount,fuel plus all your bits n pieces, I'm adding a good 200+ kg to it.

Offline Austackle 1

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2012, 07:03:25 AM »
G-day all need some help on setting up boat for bow mount,battery,livewell,etc. what I need to now is how to get the weight distribution and balance right. The boat is a 429 stacer with a 30hp mariner.

Thanks
David

David this is a much bigger question than you might think.

Most people try and get their weight distribution correct when the boat is at rest ( because it's easier that way) but in fact this is not a good idea at all. It's a much better idea initially (and a lot more messing around) to do it when underway at speed. Very much a trial and error thing on a small boat but i have seen boats very badly loaded on the plane (and inherently unstable due to uneven moments around the boats centre of buoyancy) and yet seem perfectly ok at the jetty. A boats stability on the plane is far different to when at rest.

Start off by having very little on board and get on the plane and trim the boat out until you are happy, making a note of how much trim angle you are using and how many engine revs. Then start adding the extra weight at different places and see how it affects you. On a big ship, very detailed calculations are performed to make sure the ship is loaded correctly. On a small boat it is very much trial and error.

I have a Stacer 469 with a 60hp Yamaha on the back. In order to get it running best i ended up having to change the prop to a higher revving prop as i had a lot of trouble getting on the plane when fully loaded. I have fitted the boat out now to be just about perfect when 2 people and gear are onboard. If i take a 3rd person onboard i am still just under the max weight limit but that person must sit up the pointy end so i can get on the plane. All up i reckon i messed around for at least 3 months until i was happy - and i am supposedly an expert on this sort of stuff having been an Deck Officer in the Merchant Navy and i also have a degree in Nautical Science. I was also a Coastguard Skipper for many years in Brisbane and unfortunely attended many rescues due to poorly loaded boats turning upside down.

Also you need to read the fine print about the maximum recommeded weight to be carried. I was recently a passenger on a Skeeter and all seemed ok when we first went out but on the way back to the ramp we were poirpoising very badly to the point that i insisted that the skipper slow down to 6 knots as i was totally convinced we were about to flip over.

As it turns out this model Skeeter has a 400lbs max weight limit. Put 2 big blokes in it and all the gear and then a FULL live well on the way back to the ramp and you have a recipe for disaster.

Hope this has not confused you too much mate but i would hate to see you end up in trouble
Cheers
Mike Cole




Offline Rampage

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 07:49:05 PM »
Thanks mike,your reply isn't confusing at all. I've had I think 5 boats and well aware of how the boat handles and sits with different weights distributed around the boat. This boat is my sons that we are setting up and his idea is to have everything out of sight which means everything to the bow. Being the first tinnie we've had hence the balance question. Having no power trim I think it's a bit more important to get the balance right too. Your advise is much appreciated mike. Looks like time to start experimenting and try and get it setup right.

Thanks
David

Offline Piscatorial Pursuit

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2012, 04:20:47 PM »
excellent points Mike

Offline saltydog

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2012, 06:45:34 PM »
mate i advise before you put your live well/ batterys in get a 120l esky  and fill it up full of water and it put around your boat and see where the boat rides better, i think this is the only way you get the beast positioning of where you want it, expirementing is everything and you want to make sure you do it right the first time.
zac.

Offline Rampage

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Re: Getting balance right
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2012, 08:27:55 PM »
Thanks saltydog. What would be the minimal size livewell that is permanent in the boat that would do the job. Just trying to keep the weight to a minimum that's all. Or is it a tournament requirement that the livewell must sustain 10 fish for two anglers. ie 60lt for 5 fish, 120lt for 10 fish. It will be used for tournaments.

Thanks
Rampage